NL Gazette

Aquatic birds in N.L. are nevertheless dying, perhaps because of avian flu

Nfld and Labrador

Key takeaways: 

  • ‘It’s a bunch of birds. It’s got to be in the thousands,’ states Burin Peninsula angler.
  • In the spring, deceased or dying murres were seen by the hundreds in the island’s western area.

Lifeless seabirds are being seen once again in areas of Newfoundland, primarily throughout coastal regions of Placentia Bay from Cape St. Mary’s on the Avalon Peninsula to Point May on the southern Burin Peninsula.

Over the spring, hundreds saw dying murres in the island’s western part. At the time, ocean ice was the supposed reason for the event. 

However, biologists worry avian influenza is after the die-off this time. 

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Lifeless seabirds are being seen once again in areas of Newfoundland, primarily throughout coastal regions of Placentia Bay from Cape St. Mary’s on the Avalon Peninsula to Point May on the southern Burin PeninsulaaLifeless seabirds are being seen once again in areas of Newfoundland, primarily throughout coastal regions of Placentia Bay from Cape St. Mary’s on the Avalon Peninsula to Point May on the southern Burin Peninsula

Seabird biologist Bill Montevecchi said there’s nothing anyone can do right now other than writing the mortality, the spread, and the course of the illness as it rolls across the island. 

“It looks like it’s been arriving from the west, maybe the Gulf of St. Lawrence, on the Burin, and now it’s leading up in Cape St. Mary’s,” Montevecchi declared Tuesday. “One of our researchers on Great Island had eight deceased puffins in Witless Bay. So it could just keep going.”

It’s a situation being witnessed throughout the Maritimes. Hundreds of extinct birds have been found on the beaches of New Brunswick since May.

Source – CBC News

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