NL Gazette

Furey government making too many decisions in secret say PCs

Nfld and Labrador

Key takeaways: 

  • Closed-door decisions make the public ‘suspicious,’ says David Brazil.
  • Interim Progressive Conservative Leader David Brazil says the government should be more evident in its measures. 

Opposition politicians say the local government is making crucial decisions in secret — including quietly creating a new committee led by Brendan Paddick, a friend of Premier Andrew Furey. 

Interim PC Leader David Brazil spoke with journalists Wednesday following a statement from allNewfoundlandLabrador, which said the Furey government is taking as long as half a year to share some of its findings online. 

Brazil focused explicitly on the part of the allNewfoundlandLabrador report, which looked at the output of the Churchill River Energy Analysis Team, a committee separate from the region’s 2041 committee for the Upper Churchill and one that isn’t cited on the provincial government’s website.

That committee is chaired by Paddick, a close consultant to the premier and a fellow founder — along with Furey — of the Dollar A Day Foundation. Paddick, an ex-board chair for Nalcor Energy, was picked by Furey to lead the province’s rate-mitigation unit.

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Opposition politicians say the local government is making crucial decisions in secret — including quietly creating a new committee led by Brendan Paddick, a friend of Premier Andrew Furey.

Brazil said he’s OK with Paddick leading the committee if he is a qualified candidate but sees the board as an example of Furey giving a personal friend a chance behind shut doors. 

He wants the government to be more open regarding Paddick’s role to ensure there isn’t a battle of interest.

“We request dozens of questions in [the House of Assembly] about meetings that were happening or rumors that we were hearing were happening and got closed down,” Brazil told Wednesday. “Why would you not be transparent? It’s the individuals’ asset here. Have an open discussion.”

Brazil said Paddick’s work is the latest in a series of decisions the government has made to keep data out of the public eye.

Source – cbc.ca

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